“There are states that allow inmates to choose, but it is a very different matter for a state to impose a method like electrocution,” he said. “No other state has gone so far.”

Dieter said he expects legal challenges to arise if the state decides to go through with an electrocution, both in terms of whether the state could prove that lethal injection drugs were not obtainable and on the grounds of constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment.

A Haslam spokesman confirmed to The Associated Press that the governor had signed the measure Thursday evening , but offered no further comment.

States have found themselves running out of drugs used to execute prisoners after a European-led boycott drug sales to prisons.Read more at tennessean.com